a personal archive of cultural fragments please enjoy
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nmpowers:

Made these a few times within the past week. It’s been a healthy weight watchers snack. 2 points per 5 strawberries. I hollow out the strawberries, after washing of course, and fill with one triangle of laughing cow cream cheese. I do this with a zip lock baggie and cutting off the tip, like decorating a cake. I have been using the cinnamon kind of cheese but any works! After filling all your strawberries you dip them in Graham crackers. I only need to use one half of a cracker on mine. I also use chocolate because they are less points than honey or cinnamon. Enjoy! :)

I would suggest whole fat Greek yogurt instead of cream cheese, and slivered almonds instead of graham crackers. Healthier and at least in my opinion better tasting.

nmpowers:

Made these a few times within the past week. It’s been a healthy weight watchers snack. 2 points per 5 strawberries. I hollow out the strawberries, after washing of course, and fill with one triangle of laughing cow cream cheese. I do this with a zip lock baggie and cutting off the tip, like decorating a cake. I have been using the cinnamon kind of cheese but any works! After filling all your strawberries you dip them in Graham crackers. I only need to use one half of a cracker on mine. I also use chocolate because they are less points than honey or cinnamon. Enjoy! :)

I would suggest whole fat Greek yogurt instead of cream cheese, and slivered almonds instead of graham crackers. Healthier and at least in my opinion better tasting.

(via thelindsayjones)

greaterland:

lots of notes

  • the conjuring was absolutely terrifying
  • orange is the new black is the new black
  • I learned if you ignore your problems sometimes they just go away
  • I really love sweet potato fries

In case of desperate sweet potato craving act as follows: take sweet potato, cut into 1/4 inch discs (they are easier that fries) throw some butter or olive oil in a pan and cook it until it hits a texture you like. Doesn’t take long and sweet potatoes are actually pretty damn fine diet wise.

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Coat
1875–1900
Central Asia

The quilting and unique cuff styling are of interest.

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Armored Surcoat (Manchira)Late 18th–early 19th centuryJapan

This vest-shaped manchira is lined around the neck with small iron plates sewn between the layers of fabric. Intended to be worn over an armor, it afforded the samurai added protection and wamth as well as a richer and more colorful appearance.


This item shows great promise, with appropriate adjustments.

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Armored Surcoat (Manchira)
Late 18th–early 19th century
Japan

This vest-shaped manchira is lined around the neck with small iron plates sewn between the layers of fabric. Intended to be worn over an armor, it afforded the samurai added protection and wamth as well as a richer and more colorful appearance.

This item shows great promise, with appropriate adjustments.

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Robe
Place of origin: China
Date: 1900-1960
Materials and Techniques: Cut silk velvet on a satin weave ground
Gallery note: This long velvet gown is in nearly perfect condition. It is a man’s robe, of a type that, in the first decades of the 20th century - and, in fact, right up to the end of the 1940s - was frequently worn with Western-style trousers, leather lace-up shoes and a velour trilby hat. This example has an all-over pattern of small crane roundels, which appear dark against a paler ground because they are formed by the dense, cut pile of the velvet.

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Robe

Place of origin: China

Date: 1900-1960

Materials and Techniques: Cut silk velvet on a satin weave ground

Gallery note: This long velvet gown is in nearly perfect condition. It is a man’s robe, of a type that, in the first decades of the 20th century - and, in fact, right up to the end of the 1940s - was frequently worn with Western-style trousers, leather lace-up shoes and a velour trilby hat. This example has an all-over pattern of small crane roundels, which appear dark against a paler ground because they are formed by the dense, cut pile of the velvet.

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Caftan
First half of 14th century
Eastern Islamic world or China

The David Collection
:

While the typical Arab caftan was closed in the front, the Mongol was closed on the side with a row of tapes, which in this caftan are attached to a reinforced piece around the waist. The pattern demonstrates a mixture of Eastern and Western influences. The drop-shaped elements with stylized lions and surrounding swastika shapes point to China, while the stylized border with Kufi pseudo-calligraphy on the shoulders is an Islamic feature that has its origins in Arab tiraz textiles.

arrowsandartemis:

does anyone have a simple 5 ingredient recipe they would like to share?

sorry about that first time doing that and tried hitting enter

the salad in question would be:

- a couple handfuls of baby spinach,

- 4 to 7 fresh figs (green for preference but if no figs are at all available dried apricots or dates will do fine)

- a few tablespoons of good ricotta 

- roast butternut squash (1inch cubes on baking sheet lightly covered in extra virgin olive oil 400 degrees for 30 to 45 min)

- drizzle olive oil on top although balsamic vinegar works as well

art-of-swords:

Hand-made Fantasy Swords ~ “Du-Sith” -  Civilian Longsword
“I am called Du-Sith and you were better to have me with you than against you.” - from the battle of Trai-Guinard, in Islay, Scotland 1598, credited to a faerie who helped sir James MacDonald named Du-Sith (dark elf).
This is a very light fast sword, with a 50% distal taper. The grip is wenge and the pomel and guard are silicon bronze, with sterling silver ‘genius cuculatus’ inset in the pomel. The Scabbard is carved of Wenge and is lined with close sheared sheep fleese, the fittings are cast bronze.
~~~
Weight: 1lbs14.6oz / 0.867 kg
OAL: 41” / 104.1cm 
Blade length - 32” / 81.2cm 
Hilt length - 9” / 22.8cm
Blade material: 1084 steel.
~~~
Source & Copyright: Jake Powning

*Forged 2008

art-of-swords:

Hand-made Fantasy Swords ~ “Du-Sith” -  Civilian Longsword

“I am called Du-Sith and you were better to have me with you than against you.” - from the battle of Trai-Guinard, in Islay, Scotland 1598, credited to a faerie who helped sir James MacDonald named Du-Sith (dark elf).

This is a very light fast sword, with a 50% distal taper. The grip is wenge and the pomel and guard are silicon bronze, with sterling silver ‘genius cuculatus’ inset in the pomel. The Scabbard is carved of Wenge and is lined with close sheared sheep fleese, the fittings are cast bronze.

~~~

Weight: 1lbs14.6oz / 0.867 kg

OAL: 41” / 104.1cm 

Blade length - 32” / 81.2cm 

Hilt length - 9” / 22.8cm

Blade material: 1084 steel.

~~~

Source & Copyright: Jake Powning

*Forged 2008